Blog


 

 

 

 


Brains May be Wired for Addiction

Posted by on Feb 20, 2012 in Blog | Comments Off on Brains May be Wired for Addiction

Abnormalities in the brain may make some people more likely to become drug addicts, according to scientists at the University of Cambridge. They found that the same differences in the brains of addicts and their non-addicted brothers and sisters.  The study, published in the journal of Science, suggested addiction is part of a “disorder of the brain”.   http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-16854593

Controversial Treatment ‘Reboots’ PTSD Sufferers’ Brains

Posted by on Jun 4, 2011 in Blog | Comments Off on Controversial Treatment ‘Reboots’ PTSD Sufferers’ Brains

While numerous treatments exist for post traumatic stress disorder, a cure remains elusive. But neurofeedback has proven to be especially effective — it just hasn’t been approved yet. Practitioners believe that the brain is, essentially, rewiring itself during the treatment, detecting defects in its activity and fixing them to perform more optimally.   http://gizmo.do/jVruSu

Neurofeedback Intervention in Fibromyalgia Syndrome; a randomized, controlled, rater blind clinical trial.

Posted by on Sep 15, 2010 in Blog | Comments Off on Neurofeedback Intervention in Fibromyalgia Syndrome; a randomized, controlled, rater blind clinical trial.

Abstract: We designed a randomized, rater blind study to assess the efficacy of EEG Biofeedback (Neurofeedback-NFB) in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Eighteen patients received twenty sessions of NFB-sensory motor rhythm (SMR) treatment (NFB group) during 4 weeks, and eighteen patients were given 10 mg per day escitalopram treatment (control group) for 8 weeks. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20614235

Soldiers Brains Bear Scars of Emotional Wounds

Posted by on Aug 30, 2010 in Blog | Comments Off on Soldiers Brains Bear Scars of Emotional Wounds

Eighteen months after they have returned from a war zone, soldiers bear an unmistakable sign of emotional trauma deep inside their brains. But in most, a key node of the brain’s fear circuitry returns to normal, perhaps keeping mental illness such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from developing, says a new study published Tuesday in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. Los Angeles Times.